5 Reasons You Don’t Do What Really Makes You Happy

image

When we interviewed Dr. Stephen Schueller to learn about the basics of positive psychology, he also offered insights into how we sometimes stand in the way of our happiness due to misconceptions, biases, and a lack of mindfulness.

Dr. Schueller is a professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and member of the Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies. (This is the second part of our interview, presented in edited highlights. Read the first part here).

1.  We’re too dismissive of relationships and positive emotions.

Dr. Schueller:

Positive psychology has a lot within it which is the advice our grandmother would give us:  How do we live a good life? You express gratitude, you maintain optimism, you practice kindness, you focus on relationships.

We often don’t think grandmother knows best and do our own thing, and that gets us into trouble. We often pursue things like money, bigger houses, cars — material possessions — when experiences are actually much more stronger determinants of our happiness.

 

Continue Reading

Understanding How to Function at Your Best: defining positive psychology

Here at iDoneThis, we often talk about how principles of positive psychology can be used to improve our well-being and happiness at work. We wanted to go back to basics and get an expert to explain what positive psychology is and how it can help you live your life better. So we spoke with Dr. Stephen Schueller about defining positive psychology and what progress and timing have to do with living a good life.

imageDr. Schueller is a professor at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and member of the Center for Behavioral Intervention Technologies, where he works on developing internet and mobile interventions in behavioral and mental health service delivery. (This is the first installment of our interview. Head here for the second, 5 Reasons You Don’t Do What Really Makes You Happy).

Initially I think I misunderstood positive psychology as being all about positive thinking and positive emotions — and that’s really not what it’s about.

That’s definitely true. One of the things I really try to differentiate positive psychology from is this positive thinking movement, things like reading The Secret — where you think it, you’ll get it, or think positively and your life will be better. That’s not what positive psychology is about at all.

Lots of research shows that experiencing positive emotions is very beneficial, but that’s not really the point in positive psychology. Positive psychology is a movement focusing on trying to understand what optimal functioning means.

Continue Reading

Productivity and Happiness at Work: The Best of the Internet

PUBLISHED by catsmob.com

This dog’s ready to rumble! Now read the best of what we shared on the interwebs this week:

Breaking the Bad Meeting Habit

How ShopLocket uses iDoneThis to Maximize Progress

What a messy desks says about you

Do —> Measure —> Learn faster

The Grumpy Employee’s Guide to Being Happier at Work

 

imageDundee’s Tips of the Week:  Like our blog? Sign up for our free newsletter if you’re interested in productivity, management, startups, and how to work better.

Making Others Happy: The Best of the Internet

Burger Chair with PugPugs know best…including the best of what we shared on the interwebs this week:

5 Tips to Make the Most of Your Company Retreat.

Why would you move to downtown Vegas to run your business?

How do positive emotions increase longterm conversions?

A beautiful slideshow on building culture on a remote team.

Recognize how everyone around you does good things.

Relentless questioning improves self-awareness.

The art & science of teambuilding.

imageLike our blog? Sign up for our free newsletter if you’re interested in productivity, management, startups, and how to work better.

Positivity Drives Productivity

Watch Shawn Achor’s entertaining, thought-provoking TEDxBloomington talk on the power of positive psychology.

(Source: https://www.youtube.com/)

The author of The Happiness Advantage and CEO of Good Think Inc., a research and consulting firm, points out that the common understanding that happiness as the last thing to happen after success achieved by working hard has the order all wrong.

Instead, raising the level of positivity in the present creates a happiness advantage that results in better, more productive performance. In fact, 75% of job successes are predicted by optimism levels, an environment of social support, and ability to frame stress as a challenge rather than a roadblock.

Achor recommends daily practices to rewire your brain to get on a positivity track, including journaling and acts of kindness that spread positivity to others.

Use iDoneThis to help you set up your pattern of productivity!